Exploring common cycling ailments (Pt. 2)

mark-dziuban-pain2

Like any endurance sport, cycling can come with its fair share of overuse injuries. There are a variety of pesky ailments that commonly plague dedicated cyclists, which can quickly interrupt — or end — an otherwise fruitful training cycle.

I previously explained how to approach and manage five common cycling ailments. Here now are answers to a few more frequent injuries.

 

Broken clavicle

Crashes and impact injuries are an unfortunate, but frequent part of competitive cycling — a group of fast-traveling athletes in close proximity to one another is sure to spell disaster now and then. There are obviously numerous ways these scenarios can lead to significant injury, but a common injury area is the clavicle, or the collarbone; this is not surprising, given this bone’s vulnerable exposure and front-facing position (any head-over-handlebars situation puts it at immediate risk of taking the brunt of the fall). This particular injury requires quick medical attention, so exercise common sense in any situation where you think you may have suffered a break or fracture.

 

Back pain

Given the fact that cycling usually entails a slightly bent-forward posture, it is no surprise that many cyclists mistakenly slouch during long rides, leading to pain in several critical areas — among them, the back. Additionally, many of us also hold jobs that find us sitting and bending over for long periods of time, causing an adverse shift in our biomechanics. Chronic back pain can quickly shut down a cycling season, so make sure to correct your posture problems and engage in proper stretching and strengthening exercises while you still can.

 

Arm pain

It is also not surprising that many cyclists occasionally grapple with arm pain — after all, a cyclist’s arms are responsible for the overall steering of the bike. The easiest way to correct this ailment is to check the reach on your bike; it may be too long and therefore responsible for unnecessary pressure and straining. Furthermore, check to make sure your handlebars are not set too low. These tips can also help to correct pain associated with the neck and upper back.

 

Exploring Common Cycling Ailments (Pt. 1)

mark-dziuban-neck-pain

Like any endurance sport, cycling can come with its fair share of overuse injuries. There are a variety of pesky ailments that can plague dedicated cyclists and quickly interrupt — or end — an otherwise fruitful training cycle.

Here is how to approach and manage five of the most frequent cycling ailments.

 

Achilles tendonitis

Tendonitis of any body part is never fun, as the inflammation can be incredibly painful and stubborn with movement, but the achilles tendon is arguably one of the worst spots to develop the injury — especially in cycling. Each pedaling motion and dorsal flex is contingent on a healthy achilles, and pain in this area can quickly take a cyclist out of commission. Like most forms of tendonitis, achilles tendonitis can be avoided by preventing overtraining, stretching the area properly, and taking time off at the onset of any noteworthy pain. If the injury has already developed, the R.I.C.E method is your best bet (in other words, Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation). Additionally, give yourself ample recovery time to allow all the inflammation to fade.

 

Neck pain

The neck may not be a first consideration when listing areas of potential cycling injuries, but the reality is that neck pain plagues countless riders on a regular basis. Typically, this issue stems from poor head position and even poorer riding posture. The best rule of thumb is to keep your chin tucked, make a 90 degree angle between your shoulders and upper arms, and engage the muscles in your neck while looking up. Maintain this position and you should be able to solve your neck problems moving forward.

 

Groin pain

Cycling-related groin pain is not exactly surprising, for obvious reasons, but it is also fairly easy to fix. In almost all cases, the pain is likely coming from a poorly shaped or positioned saddle. It is important that you find a saddle that fits your body type perfectly, all while making sure it is properly installed onto your bike. Even a well-fitted saddle will create problems if it is not positioned correctly.

 

Knee pain

Given the basic biomechanics of cycling, it is also not surprising that many cyclists deal with nagging knee pain. The issue is arguably the most prominent in the sport, but it can be avoided with proper footwear, foot positioning, and proper foresight in terms of overuse and overtraining. If you are already experiencing knee pain, in addition to mending the aforementioned factors, take a few days to let your patellas recovery; they are potentially delicate parts of your body that will need to be strengthened and properly healed to avoid long-term problems.